myvisionhealth.com https://myvisionhealth.com wordpress, genesis, plugins, filler Fri, 15 Mar 2019 14:22:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.1.1 What to Expect from a Dilated Eye Exam https://myvisionhealth.com/dilated-eye-exam/ https://myvisionhealth.com/dilated-eye-exam/#respond Thu, 22 Nov 2018 16:00:04 +0000 https://myvisionhealth.com/?p=1606 Dilated eye exams allow eye doctors to get a better view of the inside of the eye. If you have never had a dilated eye exam before, you may be wondering what to expect – or if you even need one. Dilated eye exams are recommended on a yearly basis for anyone age 60 or […]

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Dilated eye exams allow eye doctors to get a better view of the inside of the eye. If you have never had a dilated eye exam before, you may be wondering what to expect – or if you even need one. Dilated eye exams are recommended on a yearly basis for anyone age 60 or older. If you are African American, we recommend that you begin getting yearly dilated eye exams at age 40. This is due to an increased risk of developing glaucoma. Similarly, those who suffer from diabetes are recommended to begin their yearly exam earlier than age 60, due to the increased risk of eye disease that comes with diabetes.

What is a dilated eye exam?

During a dilated eye exam, your doctor will put eye drops into each eye. These drops dilate the pupil, making it larger. The pupil is the black center of the iris, the colored part of the eyeball. This is where light enters the eye. By increasing the size of the pupil, your doctor is making this entrance larger and allowing more light into the eye. Just as you can see better in a dark room when the window shade is opened and more light floods in, your doctor can see the inside of your eye much better with the pupil dilated. Using a magnifying lens your doctor is able to clearly see your optic nerve, macula, and retina.

Doctors use dilated eye exams to diagnose many conditions that do not have any early symptoms or indicators. Among these conditions are glaucoma, macular degeneration, retinal tears, and ocular tumors. This exam also gives your doctor a look at the overall health of your eyes.

What does dilation feel like?

Once your doctor has placed the drops in your eyes, it takes about 15 minutes for your pupils to fully dilate. Dilation is not painful or even uncomfortable. Your eyes may be sensitive to light, however, as so much extra light is entering the eyes. Bring sunglasses (or your doctor may provide some) so that your eyes will feel comfortable in normal light after the exam. Dilated eyes may also experience blurry vision, particularly when reading, using your phone, or attempting other up close activities. It is possible to drive after dilated eye exams. However, we recommend that you bring a chauffeur to your first pupil dilation. This is so that you do not have to drive with your eyes dilated before you know what to expect and how your eyes react.

How long does dilation last?

You may be wondering how long do eyes stay dilated after eye exams. Dilation lasts 4-6 hours after the drops are initially put into the eyes. This is important to keep in mind when scheduling your dilated eye exam. If you need to return to work immediately after your appointment, you may have trouble reading or working on a computer, as your vision could remain blurry until the dilation wears off.

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What Causes Bloodshot Eyes? https://myvisionhealth.com/what-causes-bloodshot-eyes/ https://myvisionhealth.com/what-causes-bloodshot-eyes/#comments Thu, 15 Nov 2018 15:50:30 +0000 https://myvisionhealth.com/?p=1599 “Bloodshot” eyes are eyes that appear red and irritated. This phenomenon is caused by blood vessels becoming dilated near the surface of the eye. Most people have the experience at some point of looking into the mirror and being greeted by their own red, bloodshot eyes. It can sometimes be challenging to determine exactly what […]

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“Bloodshot” eyes are eyes that appear red and irritated. This phenomenon is caused by blood vessels becoming dilated near the surface of the eye. Most people have the experience at some point of looking into the mirror and being greeted by their own red, bloodshot eyes. It can sometimes be challenging to determine exactly what has caused the eyes to become bloodshot. It is not uncommon to be left thinking “why are my eyes bloodshot?”

Causes of bloodshot eyes

Bloodshot eyes can have any number of causes. Some of the most common causes are listed below:

Dry eye syndrome. Dry eye syndrome occurs when the eye’s tears are not enough to keep the eye adequately lubricated. This can lead to irritation and redness.

Computer Eye Strain. Computer eye strain occurs when the eye’s become overly dry due to limited blinking while focusing on a computer, television, or tablet screen.

Contact Lens Use. Contacts lenses can cause irritation if worn for an extended period of time, or if they are not used with proper hygiene.

Allergies. Seasonal or environmental allergies can commonly cause bloodshot eyes.

Frequent use of eye drops. Overuse of eye drops that are meant to fight red eye can actually lead to the eyes becoming bloodshot more frequently.

Pregnancy. Hormonal changes that take place during pregnancy can lead to less tear production. This can cause bloodshot eyes.

Eye Injury. Even a minor eye injury can cause the eye to become extremely bloodshot. Simply poking the eye is enough to cause noticeable eye irritation.

Eye infection. Eye infections, such as conjunctivitis, can make the eye extremely red due to the irritation of the conjunctiva.

Cures for bloodshot eyes

If you are able to determine the cause of your bloodshot eyes, the next question you are likely asking is how to get rid of bloodshot eyes. Just as the causes of eye redness are extremely varied, the treatments are as well. At home remedies include using over the counter eye drops to lubricate the eyes or using a warm compress for several minutes at a time over the eyes.

The best course of action is to first visit your eye doctor to determine the exact cause of your eye redness. Some causes, such as eye infection, may require medication from your doctor. Even if no medication is necessary, it is best to rule out more serious causes by speaking with your doctor.

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Orthokeratology: An Alternative to LASIK? https://myvisionhealth.com/orthokeratology/ https://myvisionhealth.com/orthokeratology/#comments Fri, 14 Sep 2018 07:30:13 +0000 https://myvisionhealth.com/?p=1568 Myopia sufferers rejoice: there is a non-invasive alternative to LASIK eye surgery! Orthokeratology, or Ortho-K, is an alternative treatment for myopia, or nearsightedness, that does not require surgery and allows patients to spend their days with improved vision without the use of glasses or daily contact lenses. Orthokeratology is a process by which your eyes […]

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Myopia sufferers rejoice: there is a non-invasive alternative to LASIK eye surgery! Orthokeratology, or Ortho-K, is an alternative treatment for myopia, or nearsightedness, that does not require surgery and allows patients to spend their days with improved vision without the use of glasses or daily contact lenses. Orthokeratology is a process by which your eyes are fitted with special gas permeable contact lenses that are worn overnight to reshape the surface of your eyes, thereby improving your vision during the day when the contacts are not being worn. This is a temporary solution to myopia that can be discontinued at any time with no negative side effects.

Who can do ortho-k?

Ortho-k is used to correct refractive errors. These include myopia (nearsightedness), astigmatism, and even some cases of presbyopia and hyperopia. Ortho-k is most often used to treat adult myopia and also to slow the progression of myopia in children. Ortho-k is a great option for anyone who suffers from myopia and does not want to wear contact lenses or glasses during the day, but is not quite ready for laser eye surgery. It is particularly useful for myopia suffers who cannot easily wear glasses or contacts, such as athletes or those who work in environments where lots of debris is present. Ortho-k is not permanent. You can stop wearing the contact lenses at any time to allow your myopia to return to its original state.

Ortho-k is a great option for children who suffer from nearsightedness. As children are not candidates for laser eye surgery, this offers an alternative to eyeglasses or contact lenses and is thought to slow the progression of myopia. Once the eyes are closed for sleeping the contacts do not feel uncomfortable so children are able to wear them. It is an easy addition to their bedtime routine and allows them to skip the glasses in the morning while still slowing the progression of myopia.

How does ortho-k work?

Ortho-k works by reshaping the eye’s cornea overnight. The cornea is the clear front surface of the eye. It is responsible for allowing light into the eye and also makes up most of the eye’s focusing power. Refractive errors are often due to the cornea being misshapen. The cornea is the source of myopia and other refractive errors. The cornea is malleable and it is able to be reshaped overnight by the ortho-k contact lenses. Reshaping the cornea corrects the refractive errors and improves vision during the day when the contact lenses are not being worn. Many patients are able to achieve 20/20 vision during the day by using ortho-k. The lenses must be worn each night to reshape the cornea, with results lasting 24-48 hours. After this period of time, the cornea returns to its natural shape and refractive errors, such as nearsightedness, return.

How to get fitted for ortho-k

Your optometrist may be able to fit you for ortho-k lenses, or will be able to recommend another optometrist who specializes in them. For the fitting, your doctor will need to make a topographical map of your corneas. This is a painless and quick process that shows your doctor the exact shape of your cornea. Using this, they will be able to fit you for contacts that will improve your vision overnight. Ortho-k lenses are different than regular contact lenses. These special lenses may require more frequent visits to your eye doctor to be perfected and maintained. If you think that you may be a good candidate for ortho-k lenses, reach out to your eye care professional.

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How to use the Amsler Grid https://myvisionhealth.com/amsler-grid/ https://myvisionhealth.com/amsler-grid/#respond Wed, 22 Aug 2018 15:21:24 +0000 https://myvisionhealth.com/?p=1563 The Amsler grid is a simple tool that can be used at home to test the eyes and monitor certain vision problems. The Amsler grid is most often used by people who suffer from macular degeneration. Macular degeneration is an eye disease that results in vision loss due to the deterioration of the macula. The […]

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The Amsler grid is a simple tool that can be used at home to test the eyes and monitor certain vision problems. The Amsler grid is most often used by people who suffer from macular degeneration. Macular degeneration is an eye disease that results in vision loss due to the deterioration of the macula. The macula is the part of the eye that gives us visual acuity, or visual sharpness. Those who suffer from macular degeneration lose vision slowly and gradually. Due to the gradual nature of the vision loss, it can be difficult to notice and track how much vision one is losing. This is where the Amsler grid comes in to test the eyes.

What is the Amsler grid?

The Amsler grid is a square containing a grid pattern throughout and a dot in the very center of the square. When used as directed, the grid is able to pinpoint problem spots in one’s vision. The grid can be used when printed on paper and also on a computer screen to test for vision loss in both eyes. It is an at-home test that is fast, simple, and effective to monitor your eyes.

How to use the grid

When looking at the grid, you should wear any glasses or contacts that you regularly wear to read. Hold the grid 12-15 inches away from your face. Make sure to always use the grid in a well-lit room. Cover one eye at a time and look directly at the center dot of the grid with your uncovered eye. While focusing on the dot, make note if any lines on the grid look blurry, wavy, dark, or are missing completely. Repeat with the other eye.

What does the grid tell us?

If you notice any abnormalities with your Amsler grid test, contact your optometrist immediately. It can be helpful for your eye doctor if you print out a copy of the Amsler grid to bring to your appointment and mark your problems areas. Your eye doctor will be able to better diagnose and treat your macular degeneration with the information provided by the Amsler grid test. They may also perform a full eye exam, a visual field test to check on your eyes’ peripheral vision or run tests to rule out other vision problems, such as a vein occlusion. Changes in your Amsler grid can have serious implications for your eyes, so it is important to do the test daily if you have macular degeneration and to call your doctor immediately if you see any changes in either of your eyes.

Image Source: National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health via Flickr

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Progressive Lenses https://myvisionhealth.com/progressive-lenses/ https://myvisionhealth.com/progressive-lenses/#respond Wed, 15 Aug 2018 15:58:38 +0000 https://myvisionhealth.com/?p=1555 What are progressive lenses? You may have heard this term tossed around among friends, colleagues, or your optometrist’s office. If you are close to reaching a “certain age” and your vision is not what it used to be, progressive lenses may be a good choice for you in your next pair of glasses. Progressive lenses […]

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What are progressive lenses? You may have heard this term tossed around among friends, colleagues, or your optometrist’s office. If you are close to reaching a “certain age” and your vision is not what it used to be, progressive lenses may be a good choice for you in your next pair of glasses. Progressive lenses are essentially a multifocal lens without the line in the middle. They are an increasingly popular glasses choice for those who suffer from presbyopia, or the loss of near focusing ability that occurs naturally with age.

What is presbyopia?

Presbyopia occurs in everyone as they age. Even people who already wear glasses will begin to notice that they are holding their cell phone further and further away from their face to be able to read the fine print. Their prescription may still work fine for distance. However, up close their vision is not what it used to be. Progressive lenses are the most popular solution today for presbyopia.

What are the benefits of progressive lenses?

Progressive lenses offer several benefits over traditional bifocal or trifocal lenses for those with presbyopia. The most obvious advantage to progressive lenses is the cosmetic one. With progressive lenses there is no line through the lens. This makes it impossible for others to know that there are two or even three different prescription lens powers at work within a pair of glasses. The seamless nature of progressive lenses is much easier on the eyes than bifocal or trifocal glasses of the past. Your eyes can switch between prescriptions with minimal interruption between distance, near, and mid-range vision. This leads to less eye strain and a more comfortable experience for the eyes.

How do progressive lenses work?

Progressive lenses are produced in such a way that there is a natural corridor through the center of the lens where the prescription changes. There is a distance vision zone in the top half of the lens, followed by an intermediate zone for middle-distance vision, such as computer use, and a near vision zone at the bottom of the lens for close up vision. The seamless transition is much easier on the eyes than traditional multifocal lenses.

The lenses are personalized to suit your eyes and provide you with all the prescriptions that you need, perfectly positioned for your eyes. The location of the different prescriptions in progressive lenses can also be customized based upon the style and intended use of your glasses. Glasses that will be primarily for computer use can have a larger intermediate zone, while glasses that are used more frequently for distance vision can have a larger distant vision zone.

If you are interested in progressive lenses, your eye doctor will be able to work with you to create the best lens for your eyes and lifestyle.

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What is Nystagmus? https://myvisionhealth.com/nystagmus/ https://myvisionhealth.com/nystagmus/#respond Wed, 08 Aug 2018 15:56:46 +0000 http://myvisionhealth.com/?p=1511 Nystagmus is a condition in which the eyes move around uncontrollably and the sufferer is not able to focus their eyes on command. The Nystagmus definition specifies that the eyes make repetitive movements that are not controlled. These movements can be circular, side to side, or up and down. Vision is often unclear due to […]

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Nystagmus is a condition in which the eyes move around uncontrollably and the sufferer is not able to focus their eyes on command. The Nystagmus definition specifies that the eyes make repetitive movements that are not controlled. These movements can be circular, side to side, or up and down. Vision is often unclear due to the eyes’ inability to focus. The condition rarely occurs as a stand-alone condition and is often a symptom of another condition or illness. There are several types of Nystagmus including infantile, spasmus nutans, acquired, latent, and manifest.

Infantile: This type develops by the time that a baby is 3 months old. The eyes generally move from side to side with this type of nystagmus. It is often associated with other infantile eye conditions.

Spasmus nutans: This type develops in children between six months and three years of age. This is a temporary form of nystagmus that clears up on its own during adolescence. Children with spasmus nutans often tilt or nod their heads in an attempt to see more clearly – this can be a tell-tale sign for parents and teachers.

Acquired: This type develops later on and the cause is not always obvious.

Latent: This type occurs only when one eye is covered. When both eyes are uncovered they are generally able to function normally.

Manifest: This type is always present. Whether both eyes are open or only one eye is in use the symptoms remain the same. 

nystagmus and albinismNystagmus causes

Nystagmus is often present at birth or develops early in life due to neurological conditions. Acquired nystagmus is often due to trauma or disease. Other causes include inner ear problems, albinism, high refractive error, certain medications, or cataracts.

Nystagmus diagnosis

There is no nystagmus test that doctors do specifically just to diagnose the condition. Your eye doctor will likely perform a normal eye exam including obtaining your medical history, testing refraction, visual acuity, and testing how the eyes move and focus. As nystagmus is often a symptom of another medical condition, your eye doctor may refer you to see your primary care physician as well.

Nystagmus treatment

There are several options for treating nystagmus, including surgery, medication, and eyeglasses or contact lenses. Surgery on the eye’s muscles can help to strengthen the eyes and change the muscles position on the eyes to reduce the rapid, uncontrolled movements of nystagmus. There are also certain medications, such as Botox, that can help to temporarily reduce symptoms. Wearing eyeglasses or contact lenses to correct refractive error can also improve vision. It can be helpful to read large print books, increase the text size on computers and cell phones, or use a magnifying device to make focusing a bit easier on the eyes. Increasing lighting can also be helpful. If your nystagmus is caused by an underlying medical condition, treating that condition is the first step to treating your nystagmus.

If you suspect that your child may suffer from nystagmus it is important to have both their eye doctor and pediatrician examine them to determine the cause of the condition and what treatments, if any, are necessary. Similarly, if you develop nystagmus as an adult it is important to determine the cause to determine your next steps in treatment. 

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Knowing Bell’s Palsy and Its Causes, Symptoms, & Treatment https://myvisionhealth.com/knowing-bells-palsy-and-its-causes-symptoms-treatment/ https://myvisionhealth.com/knowing-bells-palsy-and-its-causes-symptoms-treatment/#respond Wed, 01 Aug 2018 06:53:06 +0000 http://myvisionhealth.com/?p=1472 We often associate paralysis with spinal trauma, and particularly paralysis of one side of the face with a stroke. While these conditions can indeed lead to paralysis, Bell’s Palsey is another condition that can produce this same result. But what is Bell’s Palsey? What is Bell’s Palsy? Bell’s Palsey is the temporary paralysis of one […]

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We often associate paralysis with spinal trauma, and particularly paralysis of one side of the face with a stroke. While these conditions can indeed lead to paralysis, Bell’s Palsey is another condition that can produce this same result. But what is Bell’s Palsey?

What is Bell’s Palsy

Photo credit to medicalclinicsofnyc.com

What is Bell’s Palsy?

Bell’s Palsey is the temporary paralysis of one side of the face caused by damage to the facial nerve that controls the movement of facial muscles. This affects one’s ability to blink, smile or frown, and perform other movements of the face.

Bell’s Palsy Symptoms

Bell’s Palsy Symptoms

Photo credit to Health And Beauty

Symptoms of Bell’s Palsy include the following:

  • The weakness of facial muscles on one side of the face. This weakness can be severe enough to cause total paralysis or quite mild.
  • Drooping of one side of the face.
  • The difficulty of inability to blink, smile, or produce other facial expressions.
  • Drooling due to inability to control mouth muscles.
  • Changes in saliva production.
  • A less acute sense of taste.
  • Pain surrounding the jaw or ear on the affected side of the face.
  • Hypersensitivity to sound.
  • Slurred speech.

Bell’s Palsy looks a bit different for everyone. Symptoms could include a combination of the above-mentioned symptoms or could include the entire list. Generally, symptoms begin to improve after a few weeks and have completely cleared up in about 3 months. In rare cases, symptoms may last longer and may be permanent in extremely rare cases.

Bell’s Palsy Causes

Bell’s Palsy Causes

Photo credit to OROGOLD School

Bell’s Palsy is thought to be caused by damage to the facial nerve that runs behind the ear and controls movement of all facial muscles. The damage most often occurs due to swelling. What exactly causes this swelling, however, is not always clear. The nerve passes through a boney corridor on its way to the face. When the nerve swells, it pushes against this corridor, causing damage to itself. The swelling is generally thought to be linked to viral infection, which can include:

  • Herpes simplex (cold sores)
  • Herpes zoster (chicken pox or shingles)
  • Epstein-Barr (mononucleosis)
  • Mumps
  • Influenza B (flu)
  • Viral meningitis

 

Bell’s Palsy Treatment

There is no simple test to determine whether or not someone has Bell’s Palsey. Diagnosis is made by ruling out all other options. Similarly, there is no medication that can easily cure Bell’s Palsey. Your doctor may prescribe steroids, such as prednisone, to bring down the swelling of the facial nerve. This can help to shorten the duration and severity of Bell’s Palsey. Treatment may also include physical therapy and facial massages. It is important to protect the eye if it is unable to blink and lubricate itself normally, so patients may be encouraged to wear an eye patch and apply lubricating eye drops as needed.

When to See Your Doctor

When to See Your Doctor for Bell’s Palsy Treatment

Photo credit to YouTube

Paralysis to any degree is a good reason to see your doctor right away. With early intervention, the swelling of the nerve may be stopped and the severity of the Bell’s Palsy may be lessened. It is also important to see your doctor right away to ensure that you are not experiencing a stroke or any other condition.

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Why do we Blink? https://myvisionhealth.com/why-do-we-blink/ https://myvisionhealth.com/why-do-we-blink/#respond Wed, 25 Jul 2018 14:11:02 +0000 http://myvisionhealth.com/?p=1435   Blinking is such a common occurrence that it is easy to forget that you are even doing it. It isn’t something that requires thought or effort. On average, humans blink 15-20 times per minute, which is significantly more than many other animals. Blinking 15-20 times per minute translates to the eyes being closed for […]

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Blinking is such a common occurrence that it is easy to forget that you are even doing it. It isn’t something that requires thought or effort. On average, humans blink 15-20 times per minute, which is significantly more than many other animals. Blinking 15-20 times per minute translates to the eyes being closed for about 10% of the time that you are awake. You may be asking, why do we blink at all? Or even, why do we blink so often? Blinking has been the focus of several scientific studies by doctors who were asking those same questions.

What is blinking?

The dictionary defines blinking as “to close and open one or both of the eyes rapidly”. This blink definition sets blinking apart from simply closing the eyes or even sleeping. Most people barely notice that they are blinking at all, unless they are blinking due to debris in the eye or as an attempt to lubricate a dry eye.

Why do we blink?

The most consistent reason that we have for blinking is to lubricate the eye. The eye needs to remain moist at all times and blinking is the body’s natural way of accomplishing this. The eye has oil glands that produce a natural lubricating oil. When the eyelid comes down over the eye during blinks, this oil is spread across the eyeball. You may notice that you blink more frequently when your eyes are feeling dry, or on windy days which can dry out the eyes.

Another reason for blinking is to protect the eyes from debris or foreign objects that can cause damage to the eye. The eyelashes are meant to collect any debris that could enter the eye, and when there is a threat to the eye blinking will happen more rapidly.

There are also studies that indicate blinking provides the brain with a moment of wakeful rest. This is thought to give our brains a momentary break from external stimuli and allow us to refocus our attention. There is evidence that this is why blinking happens at regular, predictable intervals based upon the activity we are partaking in. For example, during reading blinking often happens at the end of a sentence.

Blinking: a part of life

While blinking can take place as a means of protection, lubrication, or rest – one thing is certain: blinking is a constant in our lives that isn’t going anywhere anytime soon.

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Corneal Scratch: What to Expect if Your Eye is Scratched https://myvisionhealth.com/corneal-scratch/ https://myvisionhealth.com/corneal-scratch/#respond Wed, 18 Jul 2018 16:07:28 +0000 http://myvisionhealth.com/?p=1431 A scratched cornea is one of the most common types of eye injuries. The cornea is the clear top layer of the eye, which covers the iris and the pupil. A healthy and intact cornea is extremely important to allow the eye to focus light and maintain clear vision. While minor corneal abrasions usually heal […]

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A scratched cornea is one of the most common types of eye injuries. The cornea is the clear top layer of the eye, which covers the iris and the pupil. A healthy and intact cornea is extremely important to allow the eye to focus light and maintain clear vision. While minor corneal abrasions usually heal within a few days and do not leave any lasting effects, more serious eye scratches can result in infection or scarring that can permanently alter vision. Knowing how to treat an eye that may be scratched can help to prevent further damage.

Symptoms of corneal abrasion

The main symptom of a corneal abrasion is the feeling of a foreign body in the eye. The cornea is extremely sensitive, so even a tiny scratch can make you feel like there is something large stuck in the eye. While instinct may make you feel like rubbing the eye or blinking rapidly, these behaviors can actually lead to more damage. Other symptoms include pain, a gritty feeling, light sensitivity, headache, redness, tearing, and blurry vision.

Causes of corneal abrasion

A corneal abrasion can be caused by any number of things and it can be difficult to determine exactly what caused your scratch. Anything that comes into contact with the eye can scratch it, including: fingers, dirt, sand, makeup brushes, tree branches, paper, overwearing contact lenses, or even rubbing the eye.

What to do if you suspect you have a corneal abrasion

Although you may feel tempted to rub your eye it is best to avoid rubbing if you may have a corneal abrasion. Rubbing can damage the eye further. It is a good idea to flush the eye with clean water or a saline solution to remove any debris that may remain in the eye. If flushing the eye does not alleviate the feeling of having something stuck in your eye – it is a good idea to visit your eye doctor as soon as possible.

Corneal abrasion treatment

Minor corneal abrasions will usually heal on their own within a few days. It is always a good idea to see your doctor even for minor scratches, however, as preventing infection in the eye is very important. Your eye doctor may provide you with lubricating eye drops to keep the eye comfortable during healing, as well as antibiotic drops to prevent infection. More serious abrasions may require an antibiotic ointment and further treatment such as a special bandage contact lens (regular contact lenses should never be worn over a scratched eye). Your doctor may want to schedule a follow up visit for a day or two after your initial treatment to ensure that infection does not set in.

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Eye Health: Foods, Vitamins, and Supplements – Oh My! https://myvisionhealth.com/eye-health/ https://myvisionhealth.com/eye-health/#respond Wed, 11 Jul 2018 15:43:08 +0000 http://myvisionhealth.com/?p=1415 Healthy eyes are an important part of health in general. While certainly no one wishes to have poor eye health, many people do not take any steps to improve their eye health because they simply do not know where to begin. The good news is that taking care of your eye health is quite simple. […]

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Healthy eyes are an important part of health in general. While certainly no one wishes to have poor eye health, many people do not take any steps to improve their eye health because they simply do not know where to begin. The good news is that taking care of your eye health is quite simple. There are a variety of vitamins, supplements, and foods that can provide your eyes with the nutrients that they need for optimal health.

Vitamins for eye health

The following vitamins are all critical to the health of your eyes. Getting your daily dose of these vitamins through food, which is preferable, or through a supplement will promote eye health. The nice thing is – getting enough vitamins and nutrients doesn’t only benefit your eyes. Doing so will benefit your entire body!

Important vitamins for eye health

  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B
  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin D
  • Vitamin E

Eye health supplements 

If you are looking for a supplement to improve your eye health it is recommended that it include the following vitamins and nutrients: vitamin a, vitamin b, vitamin c, vitamin d, vitamin e, lutein, zeaxanthin, phytochemical antioxidants, omega-3 fatty acids, and bioflavonoids.

When taking an eye health supplement be sure to check the daily value to know how many supplements to take per day. It is also a good idea to make sure the supplements have not expired, and to take them with food to avoid an upset stomach.

Foods for eye health 

As with general health, a varied diet of fresh foods does wonders for eye health. The following foods provide essential vitamins and nutrients for proper eye health.

  • Carrots – It isn’t just a myth! Carrots are a good source of vitamin A and rhodopsin (essential for good night vision).
  • Fish – Cold-water fish such as salmon and tuna are an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids.
  • Fruits such as oranges and strawberries – Citrus fruits are a good source of vitamin C.
  • Naturally colorful foods such as peppers, pumpkin, and corn – Good source of vitamins A and C.
  • Nuts – Good source of vitamin E and omega-3 fatty acids that promote eye health.
  • Leafy greens such as kale and spinach – Good source of lutein and zeaxanthin, a powerful antioxidant duo that is essential for eye health
  • Eggs – Eggs are a good source of lutein and vitamin A.
  • Legumes – Good source of bioflavonoids and zinc.

Through a combination of supplements and healthy foods it is very possible to provide your eyes with all the vitamins and nutrients that they need to thrive! If you are considering purchasing a supplement or multi-vitamin to reach your eye health goals, consider talking to your eye care professional. No one knows your eyes better than your own eye doctor, and they are sure to have a recommendation for the best supplement for your eyes.

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